DETROIT PUBLIC SCHOOLS COMMUNITY DISTRICT BOARD

The Board of Education is responsible for hiring the Superintendent, establishing policies for the district, approving the budget, and determining facility needs. Two seats on the Detroit Board of Education are up for election.
 


This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election. #Vote #Detroit #2018Elections

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: I will be excited to work with the superintendent and will support his vision, in saying that as a candidate running for school board and as someone that's currently working with our teacher and students and seeing the struggle first-hand at Paul Robeson Malcolm X Academy . I will always express my desire to put our children and our community first. I will be the candidate to complete our school board by bringing my experience with our community, we must always involve our community before we make any decisions on our children's future.

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: One policy I would to see implemented. We must start testing our students the first week of school, we you must provide the essentials information to our teachers and parents about our students continuum of there learning growth trajectory, we must identify our children's strengths and opportunities and focus on their greatest need. Time is now to change, we must know their strengths and weaknesses before the last report card

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: That's why we must bring our community together and give them options and show them what our children need, even though we have a lot of people in poverty in Detroit, you never know what responsible millage we can achieve and come up with when we all work together and instead of shutting out the Unions, we need to embrace them from we have steelworkers to Carpenters to electricians we have a lot of union members with resources that would love to help our children. And yes we should close some of our middle schools and high schools, when we have children relocating from Palmer Park all the way to DIA that's unacceptable. When we have rodents in bates Academy because there's potential holes in the wall that's unacceptable, when you walk in our schools and see buckets on the floor because there's leaks in the roof and we keep patching and patching that's unacceptable.. to receive a quality education and have a safe clean environment, it should not be based on your ZIP code.

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: Instead of shutting down our low performing Schools, we all should be involved in walking around our schools, testing our children, visiting their living situations and understanding why are our babies under performing, as a community organizer myself we need to teach our teachers and parents the signs of bullying the signs of depression we need to do mental health studies in our systems. Our Last Resort should be closing a school because children are under performing, That will be the easy way out.

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: To seriously invest in our early childhood/preschool program, Recent studies show Having an Early Childhood Program is important before the age of 8, our children go through a phase of growth and development of their brains. our children develop faster than at any point in their lives and these years are crucial.

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: I am running for Detroit school board and I will always believe all of our children are equal, just because a child lives in poverty does not make them less of a person , that's why I encourage all children to attend DPS and not be segregated from each other, some private and Charter Schools should not be able to deny special education children and I'm very opposed to that however children thats enroll in charter schools are our children too. so I will look closely to Charter Schools and make sure our children are being treated fairly and have a safe environment wherever they are enrolled at. We must do better to Market ourselves and not point fingers we need to treat our teachers right and fix our buildings and raise parents expectations of us.


This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election. #Vote #Detroit #2018Elections

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: No Answer


This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election. #Vote #Detroit #2018Elections

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: No Answer


This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election. #Vote #Detroit #2018Elections

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: Review previous policies and best practices, and make recommendations to the Board that would strenthen the educational initiative.

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: I would be interested in doing research to determine the best way to improve DPSC's infrastructure, and make policy accordingly. In addition, we need to coordinate the School Board's efforts with institutions of higher learning, in order to determine the demands for specific careers.

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: Working with community partners to donate resources toward school improvement. If the building can be made safe and functional, it should not be closed, and closing of a building should be a very last result. When you consolidate, you are still closing a building.

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: We need to improve supportive and anxillary programs to meet specific needs of the students. Also, we need to Improve school community relations to help motivate student learning and parent involvement, as children perform better when their parent's are involved.

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: Implement a tutorial program for existing 3rd grade students. Encourage parents to structure activities that would involve reading, preferably at the pre-k level.

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: I would not agree with joint efforts. The pros to doing such is it may provide access to greater resources for DPSCD. However, looking at the cons of this issue, there is the risk that DPSCD will lose its resources to suburban school districts, and decrease enrollment in the DPSCD public schools due to better resources elsewhere.


This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election. #Vote #Detroit #2018Elections

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: I think that in order to support the superintendent, there has to be a cohesive vision and agreement as a whole board that is so effective that one would not have micro manage the superintendent. It's also important to have great open communication to ensure that the vision and polices are being implemented as intended or needed. If not, the board and superintendent should feel comfortable communicating openly.

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: As a board member, I believe it is crucial to create safe and healthy environments in every school that is conducive to learning and promotes whole students. Another policy of my interest is to ensure opportunities to combine college preparatory academics with technical training and workplace/ fieldwork experience geared toward real world application. In addition I advocate to support, train, and pay teachers to what is satisfactory to teach comfortably and to avoid burnout. With so many needs for our students outside of the learning experience (i.e mental, social issues, etc) there is a need for more social workers in every school consistently and frequently, while also increasing relevant resources to special education programming.

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: If the district is able to increase enrollment at a rate in which schools can't be consolidated, I believe that the schools should not be closed or consolidated. In this case, the board should seek state funding or philanthropic funding. If the enrollment is low in certain schools, it may not benefit the district overall to spend so much of funding on a low enrollment school but consolidate with another, potentially sell the building, and use more funding towards the more dense and less deteriorated schools. It is also imperative that students are still provided with transportation. If enrollment should increase after such a scenario, then funding could potential extend school buildings or build new ones.

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: The ultimate goal is to target and give necessary attention and intervention to schools who would be in potential threat to avoid being shuttered. We are looking to improve the quality of education for our students in which shuttering should not be an option.

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: To start parents and educators need to be fully informed of the full new law including the exemptions the intervention programming within it. Retention begins in the 2019 -2020 school year. The retention is triggered when a student is one year or more behind on the state assessment. Many may not know that the law can be bypassed on a number of reasons such as less than one year behind in reading, pass alternative assessment test, prove proficient in coursework portfolio, previously retained K-3 grade and 2 retention have IEP or 504 plan, less than 3 yrs of English Language Learning Programming, or parent advocates it's the best interest of the student to with approval of superintendent, has been in district less than 2 years with no Individual Reading Plan (IRP) previously, proficient in all other subject areas. Students are to be assessed within 30 days and if that they are behind, educators are to create Individual Reading Plan (IRP) and notify parents within 30days of deficient results. From here there will be a number of intervention methods such evidence based reading instruction, one-on-one and small group reading, "read at home" parent plans with training workshops, tutors, progress reports, literacy coaches for teachers. It is crucial that parents and educators are given the proper communication and adequate resources to carry these intervention responsibilities. It is very crucial to hold one another accountable early on and carry out consistency with updates to ensure that students are being properly educated and parents' standards and state standards are satisfied.

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: ndeed there ar pros and cons. In the case where the cons outweighs the pros I would not support the collaboration. I believe that a common enrollment system in which students only have to fill out one application that can apply to the schools would benefit students who may have to move to another school. The students don't have to fill out multiple applications especially if there is a family who has to relocate. A con is that families may be more readily to bounce from school to school among the district and charter schools. The pros of joint transportation is that students will be able to get to school, DPSCD will cut cost for transportation, and more students will be provided with transportation free to them which may increase enrollment in the district. The con is that the students in the district may be inclined to enroll into a charter school or suburban schools with the joint transportation. In regards to unified recruitment of teachers, I believe that should be separate. There are different standards and policies on hiring teachers across the districts.


This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election. #Vote #Detroit #2018Elections

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: The School Board will be most effective working in partnership with the Superintendent. Therefore it is important that all members of the board communicate effectively and collectively work towards creating a plan and vision for the district. As a school board member, I will make sure we all understand the goals we are working towards, the current challenges, and the stakeholders that we’ll need to engage and/or partnerships we’ll need to develop to solve these issues. I will also ensure that we are working closely with the Superintendent -- who will provide us with important updates on the district’s progress -- to determine what policies and budget decisions we, as board members, will need to prioritize.

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: As a DPS student and as someone who has studied economics and realized how important quality education is in our growing economy, I have always been aware of the issues facing Detroit schools and its students. Legislation has not prioritized Detroit’s education system and this disinvestment has affected other parts of the economy such as our city’s median income ($30,000), unemployment rate (8-9%), and poverty rate (35-40%). In 2017, DPSCD was measured as the worst performing school district in the country, with 78% of its students graduating high school. We have the largest school district in the state yet we receive limited funding per-student, teachers are among the lowest paid, on average, and classrooms are not adequately resourced. In order to understand the true health of our education system as well as the ways that disinvestment in education affects our city’s wellbeing, I track this type of data. It is clear that our city has tremendous work to do to better support our students, teachers, and classrooms. By serving on the School Board, I will focus on improving these numbers and working with legislators to reinvest in our school system.

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: I’d like to explore the idea of making sure all Detroit parents have access to quality education within 3-5 square miles of their home. Parents shouldn't have to travel far or put their children on buses to commute across the city to gain access to quality education in a safe school. I believe that there should be at least one safe and quality elementary, middle, and high school in each district. When mapping out where to place these schools, we need to make sure that these schools are equitably distributed -- based on where children actually live. For example, there should not be a neighborhood in Detroit where there are more seats than students in one neighborhood and not enough seats for students in another. This strategy allows us the opportunity to make adjustments based on demographic data and to put students first. But it will also give more insight for consolidation.

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: We have to advocate for the well-being of Detroit children. These students are being measured based on tests that fail to consider many important factors. As a board member, I’d like to coordinate with the Superintendent and his team more regularly scheduled visits with key lawmakers. We need Lansing to understand how some of their policies may adversely impact the largest school district in the state they represent. If DPSCD fails, the state also fails too. This is pure math -- the majority of Michigan school children live in Detroit, so the success of these students will determine the economic success and health of the state, both in the short-term and the long-term.

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: In this case, the School Board’s most important priority will be to educate parents. Many parents, as well as general community members, are often unaware of the policies that can affect them. Therefore, we must educate our community, listen to community members’ needs, concerns, and perspective, and then work collaboratively with them to develop a plan regarding ways we can address this issue. When having these conversations, the School Board must be transparent with community members. Transparency will build trust with parents and it will also help students who may be affected by this policy in the future.

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: My focus is to provide an environment where students want to learn and participate -- helping to remove barriers placed in front of students trying to access quality education. Many Detroit children live in the same neighborhood as their friends but attend different schools. Improving our education system is more than a path to a better economy; it is also a path to rebuild community. So, as a board member, I would be open to collaboration that prioritized and protected DPSCD students’ interests. Collaboration is vital for progress to occur (i.e.: students can compete against one another in sports, teachers can collaborate on community engagement efforts, administrators can coordinate community cleans up, etc.). Furthermore, I believe that it is the School Board’s role to facilitate these partnerships, continue to build bridges, and set tables in order to restore community.


This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election. #Vote #Detroit #2018Elections

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: Use my influence to garner the support of the board for effective teamwork, provide ideas, strategies and systems to improve immediate problems, then to address long term issues.

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: Better professional development for teachers and faculty. Where teachers are equipped with resources, and latest techniques, data shows they are happier and better prepared to teach. I want to see curriculum be more diversified as to the variety of learners among our student body. There is a need for additional courses in trades, for students not college bound. Policies demanding better in-service training for teacher-parent relationship. Better learning environments, classrooms, food service and safety for all students and faculty.

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: Population is a huge problem in DPSCD, and some buildings where there is attrition and less population, should be closed. The sale of these buildings will create revenue which can be used towards the schools where population still exist.

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

NO ANSWER

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: Town Hall meetings in the community will help inform the family units of the urgency of their cooperation and participation in the learning of their child. Reading labs for the care givers of the children is desperately needed as illiteracy is an issue among Detroit adult population. Engaging the non profit and faith based agencies in Detroit to collaborate in eradicating illiteracy among Detroit Families. I believe the Board should go all out to eradicating poor reading skills among our children.

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: I believe what is at stake are our children and their education must be our priority. Collaboration with charter schools in the city may be a necessity, but NOT with suburban school districts.

This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election.

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: No Answer

This video is not an endorsement of any candidate. VOTE Tuesday, November 6, 2018 in the General Election.

Q1. School Board Structure

QUESTION: The School Board is responsible for the vision, policies, and budget oversight for the district, while the Superintendent is responsible for implementation and day-to-day execution of operations. What would you do as a school board member to support and empower the Superintendent to run day-to-day operations effectively?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q2. Best Practices & Policies

QUESTION: The School Board’s responsibilities include approving curriculum and academic policies, as well as setting budget priorities for the district. Can you share what kind of research you have done or plan to do to get informed about best practices for schools? What are specific policies you would like to see implemented in DPSCD to improve school quality and student learning?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q3. Infastructure Challenges

QUESTION: A recent district analysis put a $500 million price tag on bringing all district schools up to modern standards, but state law prevents DPSCD from the borrowing money for repairs as other districts can. As a school board member, what strategy would you support for improving the condition of deteriorated DPSCD buildings? Do you think some buildings should be closed or consolidated?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q4. State Oversight

QUESTION: The State of Michigan has threatened in the past to shutter low-performing schools in Detroit. What can the Detroit's school board do to represent the interest of Detroit children if this happens again?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q5. Third Graders Held Back

QUESTION: Starting in the 2019-20 school year, state law will require all schools in Michigan to hold back third graders who are not reading at grade level. What role do you think the school board can play in preparing families and educators for the implementation of this policy?

ANSWER: No Answer

Q6. City Collaboration

QUESTION: In a city where only about half of the schools are in DPSCD, some civic leaders have pushed for collaboration among district and charter schools including a common enrollment system, joint transportation efforts and unified efforts to recruit teachers. Would you support DPSCD’s participation in joint efforts? What are the pros and cons for the district in collaborating with charters and suburban school districts?

ANSWER: No Answer